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Annual Meeting of the Society. Report.

One Day Conference - Glasgow
This took place in Glasgow Cathedral in January 1955 where the theme was the Christian Calendar.

Reference: Volume 25 1955, p57
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PDF icon Reports421.14 KB

Illustrations in this volume

(All between pages 30 and 31)

Colinton Mains Church: The Interior
Colinton Mains Church: The Holy Table and Lectern
Colinton Mains Church: Pulpit and Font
Colinton Mains Church: Exterior from South
Colinton Mains Church: Exterior from West

Reference: Volume 25 1955
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PDF icon Illustrations1.7 MB

The Rev Professor Thomas F Torrance, MBE, BD, D Theol, of the University of Edinburgh

This paper takes up the theme of a paper in the previous issue of the journal when Stuart Louden discussed the continuing role of the Church Service Society, with especial reference to the need for the Society to find its way back into the mainstream of the Church’s life and allow invigorated theology to result in reinvigorated liturgy. The paper examines the Apocalypse (Book of Revelation) to explore the place of the Ascension of Christ and his Second Advent in the worship of the New Testament Church, and draws out some of the theological implications of that for the liturgical movement today.

Reference: Volume 24 1954, p3
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PDF icon Liturgy and Apocalypse8.72 MB

The Rev Thomas H Keir, MA, Minister of the Parish

History traced back to the Celtic monastery of S Cuthbert  and the Cistercian Abbey, then forward to the Reformation. The interior and the furnishings are given detailed attention, and the more recent history recounted. The article is illustrated.

Reference: Volume 24 1954, p19

The Rev R Stuart Louden, BD, Minister of Greyfriars Church, Edinburgh

This develops from an appraisal of Allan McArchur’s The Evolution of the Christian Year. The statements about festivals in the National Covenant has made their position difficult, at odds with implicit beliefs at the Reformation. A description of the book’s content is given but the present author is critical of the concluding section which suggests what contemporary practice ought to be. A fuller provision is then suggested.

Reference: Volume 24 1954, p28
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PDF icon The Christian Year3.6 MB

The Rev Cecil T Thornton, BD, formerly Minister of St Margaret’s Parish Church, Edinburgh

Discusses this collection of prayers and services (anonymous but known to be by the minister Dr Cameron Lees). The paper offers a critical appraisal, comparing it favourably and unfavourably with Euchologion. He finds the (informally) revised version even stronger. Several prayers are offered as an example of its contents.

Reference: Volume 24 1954, p35

The Rev John A Lamb, BD, Ph D, Librarian at New College, University of Edinburgh

In the course of this review, there is reference to an American publication, The Liturgy of the Church of Scotland since the Reformation edited by Stephen A Hurlbut, although this is seen as dependent on current Scottish research. Olive Wyon;s The Altar Fire is also noted.

Reference: Volume 24 1954, p41
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PDF icon Recent Liturgical Literature3.33 MB

C Eeles, OBE, D Litt, LL D

English Art 110-1216, T S R Boase (OUP), by Francis Eeles.

Reference: Volume 24 1954, p47
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PDF icon Review 997.1 KB

Illustrations in this volume

(All between pages 24 and 25)

Melrose St Cuthbert’s: The Nave
Melrose St Cuthbert’s: The Chancel (Baptistry on right)
Melrose St Cuthbert’s: The Font
Melrose St Cuthbert’s

Reference: Volume 24 1954
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PDF icon Illustrations 1.54 MB

The Rev R Stuart Louden, BD, Minister of Greyfriars’ Church, Edinburgh

An examination of the legacy of the Church Service Society and a consideration as to whether a role still exists for the Society. The writer concludes that, even though much has improved, too many do not know enough about the roots and foundations of the liturgy to be able to use well the resources that are now available. We need a deeper study of the theology of worship and better observance of the Christian Calendar. Lacking also is quality in our music. One way ahead is a greater provision in the theological colleges.

Reference: Volume 23 1953, p3
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PDF icon Whither Away?4.96 MB

Frères Roger Schutz et Max Thurian

This is a reprint from a French journal which describes the foundation of the Community and outlines its aims. There is description of the patterns of worship and of the life of the brothers in their various capacities, skills and tasks. The ecumenical nature of the Community is affirmed.

Reference: Volume 23 1953, p12

Ronald G Cant, Esq, MA, Lecturer in the Department of History at the University of St Andrews: and the Rev W L Coulthard, BD, Minister of St Leonard’s Parish Church

First, the historian Ronald G Cant outlines the history of the early foundations (hospital, college), their translation into being one of St Andrews's parish churches, and the sojourn of the congregation in the university church of St Salvator. Then the current minister of the church, W L Coulthard, outlines the steps leading to the removal of the parish church to another part of the town and gives a detailed description of the new Macgregor Chalmers building. There is also a detailed account of the stained glass. The article is illustrated.

Reference: Volume 23 1953, p18

The Rev Fred Robertson, BA, Minister of Bridgend Church, Mid-Calder

The author shows that plainsong is not an innovation (as in Church Hymnary: Third Edition) and is much older than the 'old tunes' preferred by most. He outlines the experience of his own congregation, how plainsong took them back to the power (and the Scottish tradition) of unison singing. He also explains the nature of plainsong.

Reference: Volume 23 1953, p26
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PDF icon Why Not Plainsong?2.93 MB

The Rev J W Stevenson, MA, Editor of Life and Work

The writer is editor of Life and Work and describes some of the features of a recent correspondence which centred around worship. He finds evidence for hunger, and much agreement as to how to meet this more fully. Examples included a less casual beginning, more physical action such as standing or kneeling in prayer, dividing prayers, responses in prayer, speaking our confession, a more constant reference to the Sacrament even when not celebrated, more teaching about worship.

Reference: Volume 23 1953, p32

The Rev John A Lamb, BD, Ph D, Librarian at New College, Edinburgh

As always, this surveys not only books about worship but editions of liturgies in English and in other languages. Articles are included, such as that by David McRoberts in the Innes Review on sixteenth century Scottish breviaries.

Reference: Volume 23 1953, p36
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PDF icon Some Recent Liturgical Literature2.88 MB

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